Book Review

Introduction to – Manly P. Hall, The Lost Keys of Freemasonry
( or The Secret of Hiram Abiff ) 1923

 

Manly Palmer Hall (March 18, 1901 – August 29, 1990) was a Canadian-born author, lecturer, astrologer and mystic. He is best known for his 1928 work The Secret Teachings of All Ages.

Over his 70 year career, he gave thousands of lectures, including two at Carnegie Hall, and published over 150 volumes. In 1934, he founded The Philosophical Research Society in Los Angeles, which he dedicated to the “Truth Seekers of All Time”, with a research library, lecture hall and publishing house.

Many of his lectures can be found online and his books are still in print.

Freemasonry, though not a religion, is essentially religious. Most of its legends and allegories are of a sacred nature; much of it is woven into the structure of Christianity.

We have learned to consider our own religion as the only inspired one, and this probably accounts for much of the misunderstanding in the world today concerning the place occupied by Freemasonry in the spiritual ethics of our race.

A religion is a divinely inspired code of morals.

A religious person is one inspired to nobler living by this code.

He is identified by the code which is his source of illumination.

Thus we may say that a Christian is one who receives his spiritual ideals of right and wrong from the message of the Christ, while a Buddhist is one who molds his life into the archetype of morality given by the great Gautama, or one of the other Buddhas.

All doctrines which seek to unfold and preserve that invisible spark in man named Spirit, are said to be spiritual.

Those which ignore this invisible element and concentrate entirely upon the visible are said to be material. There is in religion a wonderful point of balance, where the materialist and spiritist meet on the plane of logic and reason.

Science and theology are two ends of a single truth, but the world will never receive the full benefit of their investigations until they have made peace with each other, and labour hand in hand for the accomplishment of the great work – the liberation of spirit and intelligence from the three-dimensional prison-house of ignorance, superstition, and fear.

That which gives man a knowledge of himself can be inspired only by the Self – and God is the Self in all things. In truth, He is the inspiration and the thing inspired.

It has been stated in Scripture that God was the Word and that the Word was made flesh.

Man’s task now is to make flesh reflect the glory of that Word, which is within the soul of himself.

It is this task which has created the need of religion – not one faith alone but many creeds, each searching in its own way, each meeting the needs of individual people, each emphasizing one point above all the others.

Twelve Fellow Craftsmen are exploring the four points of the compass. Are not these twelve the twelve great world religions, each seeking in its own way for that which was lost in the ages past, and the quest of which is the birthright of man?

Is not the quest for Reality in a world of illusions the task for which each comes into the world?

We are here to gain balance in a sphere of unbalance; to find rest in a restless thing; to unveil illusion; and to slay the dragon of our own animal natures.

As David, King of Israel, gave to the hands of his son Solomon the task he could not accomplish, so each generation gives to the next the work of building the temple, or rather, rebuilding the dwelling of the Lord, which is on Mount Moriah.

Truth is not lost, yet it must be sought for and found. Reality is ever-present – dimensionless yet all-prevailing.

Man – creature of attitudes and desires, and servant of impressions and opinions – cannot, with the wavering unbalance of an untutored mind, learn to know that which he himself does not possess. As man attains a quality, he discovers that quality, and recognizes about him the thing newborn within himself.

Man is born with eyes, yet only after long years of sorrow does he learn to see clearly and in harmony with the Plan. He is born with senses, but only after long experience and fruitless strivings does he bring these senses to the temple and lays them as offerings upon the altar of the great Father, who alone does all things well and with understanding.

Man is, in truth, born in the sin of ignorance, but with a capacity for understanding. He has a mind capable of wisdom, a heart capable of feeling, and a hand strong for the great work in life – truing the rough ashlar into the perfect stone.

What more can any creature ask than the opportunity to prove the thing he is, the dream that inspires him, the vision that leads him on? 

We have no right to ask for wisdom. In whose name do we beg for understanding?

By what authority do we demand happiness?

None of these things is the birthright of any creature; yet all may have them, if they will cultivate within themselves the thing that they desire.

There is no need of asking, nor does any Deity bow down to give man these things that he desires. Man is given by Nature, a gift, and that gift is the privilege of labour.

Through labour he learns all things.

Religions are groups of people, gathered together in the labour of learning. 

The world is a school. We are here to learn, and our presence here proves our need of instruction. Every living creature is struggling to break the strangling bonds of limitation – that pressing narrowness which inhabits vision and leaves the life without an ideal.

Every soul is engaged in a great work – the labor of personal liberation from the state of ignorance.

The world is a great prison; its bars are the Unknown. And each is a prisoner until, at last, he earns the right to tear these bars from their moldering sockets, and pass, illuminated and inspired, into the darkness, which becomes lighted by that presence.

All peoples seek the temple where God dwells, where the spirit of the great Truth illuminates the shadows of human ignorance, but they know not which way to turn nor where this temple is.

The mist of dogma surrounds them. Ages of thoughtlessness bind them in. Limitation weakens them and retards their footsteps. They wander in darkness seeking light, failing to realize that the light is in the heart of the darkness.

To the few who have found Him, God is revealed. These, in turn, reveal Him to man, striving to tell ignorance the message of wisdom. But seldom does man understand the mystery that has been unveiled. 

He tries weakly to follow in the steps of those who have attained, but all too often finds the path more difficult than he even dreamed.

So he kneels in prayer before the mountain he cannot climb, from whose top gleams the light which he is neither strong enough to reach nor wise enough to comprehend.

He lives the law as he knows it, always fearing in his heart that he has not read aright the flaming letters in the sky, and that in living the letter of the Law he has murdered the spirit.

Man bows humbly to the Unknown, peopling the shadows of his own ignorance with saints and saviours, ghosts and spectres, gods and demons.

Ignorance fears all things, falling, terror-stricken before the passing wind.

Superstition stands as the monument to ignorance, and before it kneel all who realize their own weakness; who see in all things the strength they do not possess; who give to sticks and stones the power to bruise them; who change the beauties of Nature into the dwelling place of ghouls and ogres. 

Wisdom fears no thing, but still bows humbly to its own Source. While superstition hates all things, wisdom, with its deeper understanding, loves all things; for it has seen the beauty, the tenderness, and the sweetness which underlie Life’s mystery.

Life is the span of time appointed for accomplishment. Every fleeting moment is an opportunity, and those who are great are the ones who have recognized life as the opportunity for all things. 

Arts, sciences, and religions are monuments standing for what humanity has already accomplished. They stand as memorials to the unfolding mind of man, and through them man acquires more efficient and more intelligent methods of attaining prescribed results.

Blessed are those who can profit by the experiences of others; who, adding to that which has already been built, can make their inspiration real, their dreams practical. Those who give man the things he needs, while seldom appreciated in their own age, are later recognized as the Saviours of the human race.

Masonry is a structure built upon experience. Each stone is a sequential step in the unfolding of intelligence. 

The shrines of Masonry are ornamented by the jewels of a thousand ages; its rituals ring with the words of enlightened seers and illuminated sages.

A hundred religions have brought their gifts of wisdom to its altar. Arts and sciences unnumbered have contributed to its symbolism. It is more than a faith; it is a path of certainty. It is more than a belief; it is a fact.

Masonry is a university, teaching the liberal arts and sciences of the soul to all who will attend to its words.

It is a shadow of the great Atlantean Mystery School, which stood with all its splendour in the ancient City of the Golden Gates, where now the turbulent Atlantic rolls in unbroken sweep.

Its chairs are seats of learning; its pillars uphold the arch of universal education, not only in material things, but also in those qualities which are of the spirit.

Up on its trestle boards are inscribed the sacred truths of all nations and of all peoples, and upon those who understand its sacred depths has dawned the great Reality.

Masonry is, in truth, that long-lost thing which all peoples have sought in all ages.

Masonry is the common denominator as well as the common devisor of human aspiration.

Most of the religions of the world are like processions: one leads, and the many follow.

In the footsteps of the demigods, man follows in his search for truth and illumination. 

The Christian follows the gentle Nazarene up the winding slopes of Calvary.

The Buddhist follows his great emancipator through his wanderings in the wilderness.

The Mohammedan makes his pilgrimage across the desert sands to the black tent at Mecca.

Truth leads, and ignorance follows in his train. Spirit blazes the trail, and matter follows behind.

In the world today ideals live but a moment in their purity, before the gathering hosts of darkness snuff out the gleaming spark. The Mystery School, however, remains unmoved.

It does not bring its light to man; man must bring his light to it.

Ideals, coming into the world, become idols within a few short hours, but man, entering the gates of the sanctuary, changes the idol back to an ideal.

Man is climbing an endless flight of steps, with his eyes fixed upon the goal at the top. 

Many cannot see the goal, and only one or two steps are visible before them.

He has learned, however, one great lesson – namely, that as he builds his own character he is given strength to climb the steps. Hence a Mason is a builder of the temple of character.

He is the architect of a sublime mystery – the gleaming, glowing temple of his own soul.

He realizes that he best serves God when he joins with the Great Architect in building more noble structures in the universe below.

All who are attempting to attain mastery through constructive efforts are Masons at heart, regardless of religious sect or belief.

A Mason is not necessarily a member of a lodge. In a broad sense, he is any person who daily tries to live the Masonic life, and to serve intelligently the needs of the Great Architect.

The Masonic brother pledges himself to assist all other temple-builders in whatever extremity of life; and in so doing he pledges himself to every living thing, for they are all temple-builders, building more noble structures to the glory of the universal God.

The true Masonic Lodge is a Mystery School, a place where candidates are taken out of the follies and foibles of the world and instructed in the mysteries of life, relationships, and the identity of that germ of spiritual essence within, which is, in truth, the Son of God, beloved of His Father. 

The Mason views life seriously, realizing that every wasted moment is a lost opportunity, and that Omnipotence is gained only through earnestness and endeavor.

Above all other relationships he recognizes the universal brotherhood of every living thing. The symbol of the clasped hands, explained in the Lodge, reflects his attitude towards all the world, for he is the comrade of all created things.

He realizes also that his spirit is a glowing, gleaming jewel which he must enshrine within a holy temple built by the labor of his hands, the meditation of his heart, and the aspiration of his soul.

Freemasonry is a philosophy which is essentially creedless. It is the truer for it. Its brothers bow to truth regardless of the bearer; they serve light, instead of wrangling over the one who brings it. 

In this way they prove that they are seeking to know better the will and the dictates of the Invincible One.

No truer religion exists than that of world comradeship and brotherhood, for the purpose of glorifying one God and building for Him a temple of constructive attitude and noble character.

 

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