SQ Leadership Books

It may well be a case that not all Freemasons feel like they’re cut out to be a leader, but that doesn’t mean it’s not impossible.

The Square Magazine has compiled a short list of recommended books on leadership skills. 

It proves that some of the greatest leaders today have struggled with confidence, management, and public speaking.

You can read how they overcame those challenges.

Thinking, Fast and Slow

By Daniel Kahneman

In his mega bestseller, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, world-famous psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, takes us on a ground-breaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think.

System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical.

The impact of overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning our next vacation―each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking.

He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives―and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble.

Topping bestseller lists for almost ten years, Thinking, Fast and Slow is a contemporary classic, an essential book that has changed the lives of millions of readers.

The Road Less Traveled

By M. Scott Peck

Now featuring a new introduction by Dr. M. Scott Peck, the twenty-fifth anniversary edition of the classic bestseller The Road Less Traveled, celebrated by The Washington Post as “not just a book but a spontaneous act of generosity.”

Perhaps no book in this generation has had a more profound impact on our intellectual and spiritual lives than The Road Less Traveled. 

With sales of more than seven million copies in the United States and Canada, and translations into more than twenty-three languages, it has made publishing history, with more than ten years on the New York Times bestseller list.

Written in a voice that is timeless in its message of understanding, The Road Less Traveled continues to help us explore the very nature of loving relationships and leads us toward a new serenity and fullness of life.

It helps us learn how to distinguish dependency from love; how to become a more sensitive parent; and ultimately how to become one’s own true self.

Recognizing that, as in the famous opening line of his book, “Life is difficult” and that the journey to spiritual growth is a long one, Dr. Peck never bullies his readers, but rather guides them gently through the hard and often painful process of change toward a higher level of self-understanding.

 

The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living

By the Dalai Lama 

Nearly every time you see him, he’s laughing, or at least smiling. And he makes everyone else around him feel like smiling.

He’s the Dalai Lama, the spiritual and temporal leader of Tibet, a Nobel Prize winner, and a hugely sought-after speaker and statesman.

Why is he so popular? Even after spending only a few minutes in his presence you can’t help feeling happier.

If you ask him if he’s happy, even though he’s suffered the loss of his country, the Dalai Lama will give you an unconditional yes.

What’s more, he’ll tell you that happiness is the purpose of life, and that the very motion of our life is toward happiness.

How to get there has always been the question. He’s tried to answer it before, but he’s never had the help of a psychiatrist to get the message across in a context we can easily understand.

The Art of Happiness is the book that started the genre of happiness books, and it remains the cornerstone of the field of positive psychology.

 

The Power of Habit : Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change

By Charles Duhigg

Charles Duhigg takes readers on a ride through the human brain to explain why we form habits and how we can change them.

Transforming scientific data into fascinating narratives, Duhigg offers a new take on human nature and its potential for change.

For anyone who’s ever wanted to break a bad habit or start a good one.

 

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

By Angela Duckworth 

The daughter of a scientist who frequently noted her lack of “genius,” Angela Duckworth is now a celebrated researcher and professor.

It was her early eye-opening stints in teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience that led to her hypothesis about what really drives success: not genius, but a unique combination of passion and long-term perseverance.

In Grit, she takes us into the field to visit cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, teachers working in some of the toughest schools, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee.

She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance.

Finally, she shares what she’s learned from interviewing dozens of high achievers—from JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon to New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff to Seattle Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll.

 

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